Allergies: after birch pollen, grass pollen is back

In its latest allergo-pollinic bulletin released in early May, the RNSA announces that “the grass allergy season is starting” with significant concentrations “over a large part of the country and especially in the West”.

Sneezing, itchy eyes, itching, difficulty breathing… With the return of good weather, allergies also return. After the birch pollen, at the beginning of May, it is the concentrations of grass pollen that are increasing throughout France. And the situation is likely to deteriorate further in the coming weeks, according to the National Aerobiological Surveillance Network (RNSA).

A phenomenon amplified by the good weather

In its latest allergo-pollinic bulletin at the beginning of May, the organization thus announces that “the grass allergy season is starting” with significant concentrations “over a large part of the country and especially in the West”.

“And the concentrations will be stronger and stronger in the coming days with days that promise to be summer,” he continues.

RNSA modeling for grass allergies from May 10.
RNSA modeling for grass allergies from May 10. © RNSA

In the Var, the Alpes Maritimes, the Hautes-Alpes and the Alpes de Haute-Provence, the combination of pollen from grasses, oak, Cupressaceae, and Urticaceae (parietaria) will also give a high overall risk of allergy.

“The risk of allergy will be lower for other flowering herbaceous plants everywhere in France, namely plantain and sorrel”, concludes the RNSA.

Regarding birch pollen, the situation will however be less critical than in recent weeks, except in certain departments in the north-east of the country where the risk of allergies may still locally reach the average level.

How to protect yourself?

For sensitive people, the first good reflex is to wash your hair before going to bed to avoid spreading the particles in the sheets. It is also advisable to ventilate your home, early in the morning or late in the evening, when the dissemination of pollen is less pronounced.

Eye drops or antihistamines (antiallergics) are also sold without a prescription on the advice of your pharmacist in the event of mild symptoms. For very sensitive people, long-term treatment may be considered with a doctor.

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