Delete my game memory! (1)

Delete my game memory!  (1)

Johan Vahlström wants to erase his memory and relive:
Red Dead Redemption
I hold the moment where John Marston rides into Mexico for the first time with the song “Far Away” played as one of the absolute best, perhaps the best, in game history. It is a special kind of magic that is very difficult to create. Being able to choose a song that fits so well into such a great moment is not easy. Is there a specific moment in my game memory that I would like to delete, just to be able to experience for the first time again, then this is exactly it. There is so much that has led up to this, which is also only a few minutes long. The best part was that I managed to ride into sunrise, as the beginning of a whole new chapter. A whole new world. Well, a new country at least. There are many specific moments in the game I would have liked to experience again, for the first time, as “the end”. My God, who really saw it coming (if you hadn’t already got it spoiled)? But for me, it’s not a talk about things. I want to travel “so far, so far away”.

Delete my game memory!  (1)

Niclas Wallin:
The Last of Us: Part II
There are many and many moments from both games I would like to have deleted and play again for the first time. But the moment that sits as glued, maybe even burned in forever on the corneas is early in the second, after the bittersweet end in the first, the situation between Ellie and Joel is a bit tense and in an attempt to lighten the mood, Joel steps in to Ellie with a guitar and starts playing. “If I were ever to lose you, I’d surely lose myself” he sings and I started laughing almost immediately. It’s Pearl Jam’s lovely song “Future Days” he sings on and it just happens to be one of my absolute favorites of all time, I was completely floored and this was not even an hour into the game. That one of the best games of all time would include one of the finest pieces of music of all time in that way was nothing but magical.

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Delete my game memory!  (1)

Måns Lindman:
Shadow of the Colossus
I could easily choose to delete my three favorite games through the ages from memory, Ocarina of Time, The Last of Us and Red Dead Redemption, but since I have already bothered about the greatness of these to curse in countless lists and articles, I intend instead to pick one another grand memory I would like to experience again, and then we talk grand in a double sense. Namely, it is impossible to appreciate the feeling of scale in the same way again after seeing a colossus for the very first time in Shadow of the Colossus. Until that moment, my playing time has consisted of a vast, barren gaming world. Gloomy and beautiful at the same time, with large plains and inaccessible mountain ranges. My only company has consisted of my faithful runner Agro and the occasional lizard and the feeling of loneliness has been both welcome and ominous. But all of a sudden it’s there. In all its grandeur. A magnificent specimen of biblical proportions. I do not even reach the calf of the hairy uncle but have to climb up for all its anatomical parts and kill it. Cold-blooded and in silence. It is massive, respectful and totally uninterested in my presence. I’m completely insignificant, at most I’m easily annoyed like that summer bee that refuses to disappear even though I wave my hand. But I spit in my fists and start the long way up but fall quickly when I discover that my endurance is not infinite. In the end, however, I reach the top and run the sword right through the poor giant’s skull. It has not really hurt me and looks at me with sad eyes before it dies. I feel anything but heroic but at the same time I know that I have just experienced something I will never forget.

Delete my game memory!  (1)

Marie Liljegren:
Resident Evil 2
Today, zombies are not something you raise your eyes to. Decaying and rotting facial features are the new black. In recent years, the box has been filled with series of undead and even the cinema screen has been flooded with antagonists who can only meet their creator through a shot in the head or a knife in the forehead. But in 1996 and 1998, when the first two parts of Capcom’s game Resident Evil thundered in, they were what I would call exotic and something that has fallen into oblivion since Sam Raimi’s splatter films Evil Dead came and scared us out of our minds during the happy eighties. Actually, I would like to erase my game memory on both Resident Evil and Resident Evil 2, but since I can only choose one, it will be Resident Evil 2, because that was after all where my eternal love for the game series was awakened. I want to press the delete button so I can forget when I opened the door to Raccon City’s police station for the very first time with my breath in my throat after a leap march called duga.

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When I heard the sound of my footsteps on the polished marble floor that echoed in the otherwise ominous silent hall. My first encounter with what I thought was a survivor, until he turned his rotten face against mine and interrupted his carcass target in the form of a half special based on meat approved only by Hannibal Lecter and Jeffrey Dahmer. I want to erase the memory when I crawled under the blinds just to quickly crawl back to safety after letting my flashlight dance across the corridor where I then discovered what looked like a bloodbath in the dark. I want to delete my first meeting with Mr. X when he stepped out of the burning crashed helicopter and began his constant search for me, he and his over two meter long body and fists like dasslock. I want to erase the moment I first encountered a Licker in the narrow corridor and I had to face my own death there and then after receiving a kiss and a lasting suction mark from the roof-climbing blind creature. I want to back the band when dog lover Majsan met the first doggie she did not want to pet and cuddle with in her life, the undead Dobermann pinscher who chased me down in the garage as if I were a chop he wanted to put his teeth into.

I want to press to erase when I pulsed around in dirty water up to the waist in the sewers and first met Arne Alligator who lurked beneath the surface and thought I would probably be erotically sexy with an amputated look or with a wooden leg. I want to erase the game from my memory to experience all this that made me the player I am today, still a lifesaver, but one who still dares after all. I want to see it with new innocent novice eyes, not like now when I play it over and over and know what’s lurking behind the next crest. Sure, I’m still jerking and scared, but I still know what’s coming.

I want to be surprised and conversely that I still liked a horror game filled with zombies once again. That I dared to play when I really just wanted to turn off and hide behind the nearest pillow of down while my heart rate went back to normal again. Imagine having all the games in the series in front of you and not behind one? A whole lot of magic on a record, like a really good movie but which you keep in control of. Imagine being able to experience it. Would be quite great with a remote control that Adam Sandler had in Click. Then they would not only have erased game memories and started over, but perhaps also bad life decisions. Where’s Doc Brown when you need him?

Delete my game memory!  (1)

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Henric Pettersson:
The Last of Us
There are many games I wanted to erase from my memory in order to experience them “for the first time”. Dozens, probably. However, there is nothing that even comes close to Joel and Ellie’s first journey. Of course I’m talking about The Last of Us. For me, this was a game where Naughty Dog took the story in games to a whole new level we had never seen before. Not only was it terribly beautiful, it was also very fun in terms of gameplay. And, yes, I realize I’m the billionth person to make that joke. It’s kind of terribly trivial if you look at the big picture. But now I probably ran off on a siding, because the very thing of wanting to erase The Last of Us from my memory depends on the story. I immediately became attached to Joel as a character and like Petter, the tears began to flow just fifteen minutes into the game. Something that has never happened before. From that point on, Neil Druckmann and the rest of the gang at Naughty Dog had an iron grip on me, and I fear I’ll never get to experience a similar gaming experience. It was a fantastic trip, from start to finish.

Delete my game memory!  (1)

Jonas Mäki:
Halo: Combat Evolved
That feeling of taking the first stacking steps with a green space man in a game world we have never seen before, all the while scary aliens attack and the silence is sometimes broken by perhaps the most powerful soundtrack an action game has ever had … Playing Halo: Combat Evolved was something that made an impression. Current consoles at its launch were Dreamcast, Playstation 2 and Gamecube, all of which were fine but on a completely different level in terms of performance than the Xbox. It made it an experience I had never really had before where every conceivable building block surpassed everything I had seen before. After Pillar of Autumn crashed against the surface of the ring world and I was alone with Cortana, while the emergency rockets from other survivors dissolved the sky, there was that feeling of experiencing something historical, and I would really like to experience it for the first time again.

Delete my game memory!  (1)

André Lamartine:
Bloodborne
I lost my Dark Souls virginity quite late, starting with Bloodborne which I got via PS Plus. I remember how discouraged I still was by the infamous difficulty of the From Software games, and without even touching a single game, I had decided never to expose myself to the dogmatic GIT GOD audience. Today I am one of the fanatical chairs who now laughs at game journalists’ sob articles about how unfair Elden Ring is and I have Bloodborne to thank for my burning love for Soulsbornkiro (or whatever you want to call it). I remember how frustrated and angry I became by the design of the games and I remember how I often complained here in our forums when I reached Father Gascoigne, who I then considered to be the most difficult boss I have ever encountered in a game. Suddenly … it clicked. My view of the track design, my way of playing, my adaptability changed radically once I realized that I continued to repeat the same mistakes. The definition of insanity, and all that. I let go of my pride and my prestige as in one of those movie scenes when the character finds inner peace and acceptance – and then I did. I defeated the werewolf and was changed, reborn. I was a completely different person after that boss fight and it has felt that way every time I have defeated a brilliant boss in these games. So this is a moment – and a game – I want to erase from my memory to once again feel how I entered the game series as a boy and came out as a bloodthirsty hunter.

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