Delete my game memory! (2)

Delete my game memory!  (2)

Patrik Severin:
Operation Flashpoint: Cold War Crisis (Rolling Thunder)
I love what today is actually called Arma. But before the licenses were moved around, the series was called Operation Flashpoint. It was a serious simulation of combined warfare in a way that had not existed before in the gaming world. I still remember one of the later missions when you were given the task of, like a platoon, more or less destroying the enemy by advancing like a tank commander. If I remember correctly, you had four carriages under your control. Then in 2001 when I was not so incredibly old, this was something beyond this world. Directing around combat vehicles on a battlefield of this scale was only seen in film or strategy games.

I think of many moments through the years and the magic that were there. When gaming was something amazing and exciting. I would like to erase the memory of this and relive it with the same feelings today. There was something unique about the tactical games of the early 2000s like Ghost Recon and Rainbow Six and more. The Rolling Thunder mission was one of many game moments that I still remember today as something incredibly positive and exciting in its time. Alongside Army but the first for PC, I often played this both with others and alone. I was blown away by the details, the authenticity and the realism. The world was so well made that it felt like a real place we were fighting for.

Even when I look back at these unrealistic, visually ugly and clumsy games with today’s technology, I can not sit there and wonder how it would feel to play through something like this again or in modern graphics and experience that joy, pleasure and fascination that came up with the technology at the time. Rolling Thunder was one of the better missions in this game that really showed how much the concept behind the series could shine. Although I could have chosen Mass Effect, Total War: Rome, The Elder Scrolls or Red Dead: Redemption 2, I stuck to this. There was something about Bohemia Interactive’s first, which was one of the early games that sold me on what technology could do. A wow experience mixed with other emotions and impressions intact is something I would like to experience again.

This is an ad:

Delete my game memory!  (2)

Marcus Persson:
Day of the Tentacle
Of course, there are almost infinitely many different games I have enjoyed over the years that one wishes could have been relived again without the knowledge of all the fantastic things that awaited one. The vast world of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild with all its fantastic challenges. The fabulous and majestic giants of Ueda’s Shadow of the Colossus. The mystique and claustrophobic horror beneath the surface of the planet Zebes in Super Metroid. The immense wow factor over the fourth GTA game in the series and Nico’s heartbreaking, engaging and well-written journey through the underworld in Liberty city. But more than anything else and maybe a little untipped, I wish I could have re-experienced Tim Schaefer’s magnum opus Day of the Tentacle.

Almost thirty years have passed since the game was first released and I remember so well how I and my best friend sat who pasted that summer 1993 and were enchanted by the grandeur of the CD-ROM game. Its impossibly beautiful graphic style, all the voice acting and how every little progress in the increasingly impossible puzzle gave an almost euphoric feeling through our bodies. The frantic pursuit of the vicious purple tentacle and the desperate struggle to reunite the three friends Bernard, Laverne and Hoagie is simply a journey that in my many years as a TV player has never really been surpassed. Maybe there is an ounce of childhood shimmer all over it but to once again experience that journey under the same circumstances and emotional stage would have been a real dream.

Delete my game memory!  (2)

This is an ad:

Olof Westerberg:
The Last of Us: Part II
I’m just shaking when I think about it. The idea of ​​experiencing The Last of Us 2 again – albeit for the first time – is dizzying. Never mind that Naughty Dog’s sequel to Joel and Ellie’s epic struck a specific nerve in me. Even at the afterwords, I was pretty sure that this was the biggest thing I’ve ever been through in the game and now, almost two years later, I’m even more sure of my thing. I sat glued throughout the adventure, roared like a child when Joel was killed in the prologue and was then just as hopeful during each flashback: Only Joel and Ellie got to be together a little, a little more. If only in memory.

When Ellie towards the end then picks up the guitar to play the song Joel once taught her, Pearl Jam’s Future Days, only to relive what once tied them together again after Ellie found out about Joel’s “betrayal”, can she did not play it. Ellie places her fingers against the fretboard and clicks on the strings but it sounds fake. The notes do not sit and you do not understand why, until you see that she lacks fingers. The trip has not only meant that Ellie will never be able to meet Joel again – but also that they will never be able to be reunited in music. It is so heartbreaking that I had almost given my own fingers to experience the whole adventure, and especially the end, for the first time. Again.

Delete my game memory!  (2)

Johan Mackegård:
Outer Wilds
I really love Mobius Digital’s atmospheric space adventure, Outer Wilds, I do. So much so that I am willing to say that it is one of the best and most atmospheric games I have ever had the honor of experiencing. The music testifies to a distant dream of adventure in a large and unexplored world where anything is possible and to actually be able to travel around among the celestial bodies and explore the small solar system is nothing but a wonderful journey from beginning to end. I sincerely wish I could experience everything again for the first time, because if you have once seen the end of Outer Wilds, it is not possible to come back and play it again, at least not in many years. For Outer Wilds, it’s not about managing levels and collecting upgrades to get to the next part of the game, but about what I, Johan, learn from the game world based on the clues that are scattered. Therefore, it is not possible to return. I have seen everything and already have the knowledge of how to go about reaching the Eye of the Universe and could also do so without even having to invest 20 minutes of my time. The journey is the goal of this indie gem and I would love to go through it one more time, just one. I want to forget everything I know about Outer Wilds because I want to see everything again for the first time.

This is an ad:

Delete my game memory!  (2)

Petter Hegevall:
Half-Life
I will never forget that moment, ever. I will also never appreciate what Valve’s masterful debut title offered and I will forever love Gordon Freeman’s sooty nightmare Tuesday at work, where a portal to an alien dimension opened up and filled the underground research base Black Mesa with a myriad of unfriendly space monsters. However, it was not the alien race from planet Xen that etched itself in my memory, at least not in the first place. Instead, it was the meeting with the special soldiers that I hold as the game memory that I would like to have erased, so that I can experience it again. I remember standing high up on a staircase in one of the environments towards the end of the Black Mesa portion of Half-Life and seeing how a giant gate opened and eight soldiers crouched in, with a crouched posture and red berets on their heads. I remember very well how I thought; “Finally, help is here” whereupon the soldiers opened fire on the unarmed scientists who ran towards them with their arms outstretched, which in my opinion is one of the most effective “twists” in a game ever and a moment that I often relive in my head, just by closing your eyes. After knocking down all the researchers, the master exclaims; “Find the rest and neutralize them, shoot on sight” which of course made me put my legs on my back, and if there is one game memory I want to erase, it is this wonderful moment from Half-Life.

Leave a Comment