Drought: an exemption allowing the watering of part of the golf courses creates controversy

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C.Blondiaux, France 3 Regions, N.Jauson – France 3

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While France is hit by drought, a derogation creates controversy, Friday August 5th. Golf clubs can indeed continue to water part of their course.

A bright green lawn like you don’t see much of at the moment. In Dampierre-sur-le-Doubs (Doubs)part of a golf course is regularly watered. “We still have the right to water certain areas, especially the starting areas”explains Matthew BeyerGolf Director of plum. Watering is also authorized for the greens, the areas around the holes. But in times of drought, these authorizations raise questions and are controversial.

Several elected officials reacted to these authorizations, such as Éric Piolleecologist mayor of Grenoble (Isere) : “In the anti-drought decrees, there is an exemption to allow the watering of golf greens! While we call for sobriety, the practices of the richest are protected. A position shared by the environmental association France Nature Environnement. “Eastleisure of this type is a priority choice when we are in times of crisis?questions its vice-president, Anthony gaper. Golfers defend themselves by explaining that they only water a small part of the field. On average, a golf course requires 25,000 cubic meters of water per year.

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