Figment: Journey Into the Mind

Of course, humor is the first thing I associate with Monty Python, but as a good second come the animations signed by Terry Gilliam that appear in the group’s works. However, it is not only the simile of this peculiar visual style that can be applied to Figment: Journey Into the Mind, but also the touch of overly fuzzy content that Gilliam’s animations exhibit. But when you place a game inside a person’s head, it is at the same time quite a given that you can go outside all the rules and frameworks of art and do whatever you want. So, whether it’s teeth falling from the sky or the fact that we get little musical numbers every now and then, Figment: Journey Into the Mind is a mindless mix of very, very strange. Everything is then neatly woven together in a clever little action adventure.

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Poor Dusty just wanted to have a drink alone but instead is forced to hunt around for his scrapbook.

The main character Dusty, who was just going to get ice for his drink, loses his scrapbook and wants it back. Yes, you can hear for yourself what we are being introduced to. What follows is imaginative in the very best sense of the word, with slightly tricky puzzles that need to be solved in order to progress through the game’s varied environments. The unique visual style is one of the game’s strongest cards, along with the simple fact that it’s actually quite fun to play. You could use classic words like pleasant and fun, and I find myself falling back on the positive rather than the negative when summarizing the short little adventure. There are simply enough wonderful ingredients here to make the experience as a whole enjoyable.

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We’ve done pushing blocks before, it’s fun here too.

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Dusty’s search for his scrapbook, which is stolen by one of the game’s Nightmares and also bosses, is as mentioned lined with small puzzles that initially consist of the type “This needs a battery to work”. His progress is hampered even in simpler battles where slashes with a wooden sword and roll-away maneuvers are about what’s on offer. In many ways, the game’s problem solving and action also sum up the game as a whole as it is quite simple. Although the game’s content as a whole is rather unassuming, most of the environments surprise and I am especially entertained by how varied the problem solving becomes as the adventure progresses. There is otherwise only one thing to collect here in the form of memories to look for, and that one’s health can be upgraded, but that is all that is offered aside from the main focus of the game.

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The game’s puzzles are of varying type and simple but entertaining.

I don’t want to reveal the craziest (and best) moments of the game, but I can at least mention that a lot lies in the way music and sound are used. It is a mixture of all kinds of madness that is presented, and if you are in the mood for easy problem solving, wrapped in a wonderful aesthetic, then Figment: Journey Into the Mind offers just that in an entertaining way. We’ve seen before how a journey through someone’s mind can be imaginatively painted in, for example, the Psychonauts games, and how fun and crazy it can be.

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The game’s battles belong to the weakest part of the game, without being useless for that reason.

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The Danish indie developers behind this game have definitely taken advantage of most of what is needed to make it feel so funny that you often sit with a smile on your face. The game’s battles are perhaps not exactly among the highlights and as a whole this game is not something that goes down in history. But in summary, it is the visual style together with the humor, which is several times fuzzy in a way that few games dare to be, that makes it quite a fun but above all very unique experience.

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