"I do everything so that Nestlé comes face to face with me": the fight of Nathan’s father, who died because of a Buitoni pizza

Yohan Aiech is the father of little Nathan, who died in February after eating a Buitoni pizza. Today, he is asking Nestlé to account.

Nathan would have been 9 years old on Monday, but he died last February. He is one of 55 people infected with the Escherichia coli bacteria in Buitoni brand Fresh Up pizzas.

Faced with this impossible mourning, his father Yohan Aiech tries to resume the course of a life broken by grief.

“Today is Nathan’s birthday. I found myself getting out of work, going to put a flower on his grave,” he says with emotion at the microphone of BFMTV.

Today, the father is asking accounts from Nestlé, the group that owns the Buitoni brand.

“I tell [à Nathan] that I do everything so that Nestlé comes face to face with me and that they explain to me why”, he continues.

“They don’t listen to us”

Because if the production of pizzas has been stopped in the Caudry factory in the North, Yohan Aiech explains that he wants “culprits but also explanations”. The group has also announced that it wants to reopen the production lines next November, with the green light from the health authorities. The father especially deplores the lack of response from the public authorities.

“We are not considered by justice, we are not considered by the political class. We are not listened to. Only money manages to make things happen,” laments the bereaved father.

With his lawyer who represents 48 families of victims, Me Pierre Debuisson, Nathan’s father has just initiated a procedure for gross negligence. They are claiming 250 million euros in damages from the Swiss group.

“His inadmissible faults”

“These are damages that are equal to the unprecedented human tragedy. Nestlé has still not become aware of its inadmissible faults”, explains the lawyer at the microphone of BFMTV.

He hopes that this sum will avoid new tragedies. “Nestlé is a group that generates 80 billion in turnover per year, it is a damage that seems to us to be entirely proportionate and which will perhaps encourage the group to no longer commit such faults”.

Last May, the Paris public prosecutor’s office opened a judicial investigation for manslaughter, involuntary injuries, placing on the market of a product dangerous to health and endangering others.

Maxime Meunier, Sebastien Savoye and Valentin Demay

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