Knut-Johan (78) voted Ap at the last election – he will not do so next time

TV 2 meets the pensioner at home in his home in Bergen while he is having a heat pump installed in an attempt to reduce electricity costs.

– After my wife died at Christmas, I only have one pension, and it was noticeable when electricity prices skyrocketed, says the 78-year-old.

He says that while he normally receives an electricity bill of NOK 1,200-1,300, in January it was NOK 5,600.

EXPENSIVE ELECTRICITY: Pensioner Knut-Johan Amundsen took action after his electricity bill multiplied.  Photo: Robert Reinlund.

EXPENSIVE ELECTRICITY: Pensioner Knut-Johan Amundsen took action after his electricity bill multiplied. Photo: Robert Reinlund.

– Then I found out that I had to do something. It doesn’t help to wait for the government, says Amundsen.

Voted the Labor Party

He voted Labor at the last election, but he will not do so next time.

– It was supposed to be the turn of ordinary people. That has indeed become the case with the electricity and petrol prices we have now. We are managed by people who have never been in work and do not know what is happening beyond their small circle, says the pensioner.

He does not understand what the government is waiting for.

Støre after the power crisis meeting: – Looking at arrangements for business

– I also don’t understand that the power companies are allowed to sell electricity downstream to Germany and England. In northern Norway you only pay a few cents, and we are unable to build a transmission line across the Sognefjord even once, says Amundsen.

Still power support

Prime Minister Jonas Gahr Støre (Ap) told TV 2 on Wednesday that households will receive an improved electricity subsidy scheme from October, as previously announced.

– Now we are introducing measures where we prioritize filling the water reservoirs and providing electricity support to households, said the Prime Minister.

Støre confirms to TV 2 that the electricity support scheme for households will stand as long as the electricity crisis lasts.

Conservative Party leader Erna Solberg launched a proposal on Wednesday to speed up increased electricity support for households.

High demand

These days, the pensioner in Bergen is not alone in installing a heat pump in an attempt to reduce the electricity bill. The company that installs the pump expects to double its turnover from last year, and has already surpassed last year’s.

DOUBLE THE TURNOVER: General manager of Berge Energi, Morten Berge, is experiencing a tremendous demand for heat pumps.  Photo: Robert Reinlund.

DOUBLE THE TURNOVER: General manager of Berge Energi, Morten Berge, is experiencing a tremendous demand for heat pumps. Photo: Robert Reinlund.

– Most people state that electricity prices are the reason they buy a heat pump. Electric heating is expensive, and a heat pump can halve the heating costs compared to a panel oven or oil oven on wheels, says general manager of Berge Energi, Morten Berge.

Low temperatures

He says that they are now working hard to meet the high demand.

– The temperatures are low, and we have customers who order because they are freezing, says Morten Berge.

The country’s largest importer of heat pumps is also noticing the trend.

– The high energy prices have led to tremendous growth in the market. The increase this year is 18 per cent, but compared to the same period in 2020 the increase is 63 per cent, says sales manager Andreas Kvamme at ABK-Qviller.

He says the expectations for the autumn are high.

– The phones are glowing and there are challenges in getting hold of enough heat pumps, says the sales manager.

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