No improvement in sight: films from Fuji remain scarce

The retro wave of photography with analog cameras is still unbroken, Leica recently relaunched the M6, first introduced in 1984. Only one problem remains: where do the films come from?




In addition to Agfa and Kodak, Fuji has been a fairly reliable supplier in recent years, but it could not stay that way. As the company now on communicated on its website, there are not only acute delivery difficulties – the shortage is expected to last longer, Fuji does not give a date for an improvement in the situation. The only succinct reason given is “scarcity of raw materials”, after all: with Japanese politeness, Fuji also apologizes.

Both negative films for prints and slide films are affected. In the case of the former, Fuji calls the versions Fujicolor 100 and Fujicolor Superia Premium 400. Among the cartridges for slides, Fujichrome Velvia 50, Fujichrome Velvia 100 and Fujichrome Provia 100F remain rare. A quick check with German retailers revealed that some of the films are given delivery times of six months or more.

Some observers fear that Fuji could pull out of the production of 35mm film altogether with this announcement. The question behind it should rather be how much the production of the still popular Instax films for the instant cameras of the same name is interlocked with that for the 35mm films.

When looking for fresh films, it is generally helpful to look out for current versions. While many older films, including Fuji films, are still available, without reliable storage information, there is no guarantee that they will be of good quality. A specialist shop that offers so-called “New Old Stock” (NOS) and has stored it well itself can help to actually get a usable film.


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