“Papergate” at the Queen’s service – A piece of paper is now world famous

“Papergate” at the Queen’s service |

A piece of paper is now world famous

The state funeral of Queen Elizabeth († 96) on September 19 was carefully planned for decades. Faux pas with an audience of millions? Not wanted. The monarch of the century should be in focus one last time, and without a hitch.

But suddenly there was in the Westminster Abbey but an unplanned eye-catcher: a piece of paper! Yes, you heard me right.

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Neither tinkered Prince George (9) a paper airplane nor was secret information revealed on the sheet. TV cameras showed: It was a piece of paper that slipped out of one of the clergymen’s hands and – white side up – sailed to the ground. Whether there was a song text on the other side, a Bible verse or the schedule of the funeral service – only the man himself knows.

However, picking it up was out of the question for the time being, as that would have disrupted the ceremony. The mysterious piece of paper stayed there for quite a while and was wonderful to see on the dark stone floor.

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A piece of paper goes viral

It’s always amazing what can cause a sensation on the internet. As in this case.

The excitement about the piece of paper was great and spread like wildfire via social media. A new hashtag was born: #papergate.

Users speculated wildly as to whether and what the consequences of the faux pas would be for the clergyman and, above all, what was on the note at all.

Probably the most famous piece of paper in the world even got its own Twitter account under the @FuneralPaper account. “The guy who dumped me is going to have his own funeral soon,” it says jokingly.

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Another user tried to reconstruct the thoughts of the Papergate polluter: “Sh***, it’s too far to walk to. Am I leaning forward? Will anyone notice? Surely nobody will notice.”

Twitter users’ imaginations go even further: from a lettering on the sheet that says “Don’t let me fall” to a possible Netflix spin-off of the series “The Crown” called “The Paper”. Users really imagine everything.

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The paper wasn’t everything

Another Twitter user was amused by the black and white tiled floor at Westminster Abbey. The pattern resembles a chessboard, which is why he feared: “Now that we have the king, all events will probably take longer, since he can only move one tile at a time.”

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To explain: In classical chess the piece of the king can advance only one square per move. The lady, who would be the equivalent of Queen Elizabeth II, so to speak, can move back and forth on the field as far as she wants.

A funny moment during an actually sad event. As the Queen was known for her sense of humour, I’m sure she would have laughed heartily.

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