Temperatures: Energy: When does the landlord have to switch on the heating?

Berlin
It’s getting noticeably cooler outside and in the apartments. But the heating systems are not already switched on everywhere. which applies here.

This year, the temperatures have already dropped considerably in mid-September. Yet winter is still to come. So some people already have theirs heating turned up But for many tenants this is not possible. The central heating system in your house has to be switched on first.

When that happens, he can landlord not decide at their own discretion. Because property owners have rules when it comes to heating. We have compiled the most important points for you. Also read: Heating check will soon be mandatory: millions affected

When does the heating season start?

As a rule, the time from October 1st to April 30th in Germany as a heating period. According to the Berlin Tenants’ Association, there may be deviations depending on the agreement in the rental agreement. In some contracts, the heating period is set to run from September 15th to May 15th. But that is rather the exception.




When does the landlord have to switch on the heating?

Even outside the heating period, the landlord may have to turn on the heating. Because he is not allowed to rent the tenants freeze and may even endanger their health.


“The landlord must therefore heat at the latest when the room temperature falls below, even temporarily, during the day 18 degrees sinking and it is foreseeable that the cold weather will last longer than one or two days”, the tenant association explains on its website.

In addition, if the room temperature falls below 16 degrees during the day, the heating must be switched on immediately. Even if the outside temperature is less than 12 degrees for three days, the landlord must heat. More on the subject: Fan heaters deliver heat at the push of a button: 5 models in the test

Heating: How warm does the apartment have to be?

According to the tenants’ association, there are two here legal opinions. During the heating period agreed in the rental agreement, the landlord should ensure the following temperatures between 6 a.m. and midnight:

  • Bathrooms should have 23 degrees
  • Living room 21 degrees
  • Children’s room 20 degrees
  • Kitchen and bedroom 18 degrees
  • Hallway 15 degrees

In another case, the judges ruled:

  • Living rooms should be 20 degrees from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m
  • Bathroom and toilet from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. 21 degrees
  • all rooms from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. 18 degrees

Of the German Tenants’ Association summarizes the situation as follows: The heating system must be set in such a way that a minimum temperature between 20 and 22 degrees can be achieved. 18 degrees would be enough at night.

Energy crisis: do tenants have to heat?

Unlike the landlord, there are none for the tenants duty for heating. This means that the radiators can also be turned down completely if, for example, a longer trip is pending or the residents want to save because of the energy crisis.

But be careful: Tenants must ensure that there are no damage caused by too low temperatures. Also interesting: New measures to save energy – What is now prohibited

Landlord does not heat: What claims do tenants have?

If the apartment is not warm at all or not really warm in winter, tenants have various options to persuade their landlord to heat it. According to the tenants’ association, there is a defect if the minimum temperature of 20 to 22 degrees is not reached in winter. You might also be interested in: Electricity price shock? Municipal utilities fear a chain reaction

First of all, tenants should ask the apartment owner to switch on the heating system. If that doesn’t work, one is recommended legal advice. Depending on the case, the landlord can be forced to heat by means of a temporary injunction. However, rent reductions or cost reimbursements for the purchase of an additional heater are also possible. (fmg)

This article first appeared on morgenpost.de.


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