Vaccine against COVID-19 will be mandatory in Costa Rica to attend shops, other public places

File photo.  A Costa Rican health worker prepares a dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine as part of a vaccination campaign against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) aimed at migrants regardless of their legal status, in San José, Costa Rica October 12, 2021 REUTERS / Mayela Lopez
File photo. A Costa Rican health worker prepares a dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine as part of a vaccination campaign against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) aimed at migrants regardless of their legal status, in San José, Costa Rica October 12, 2021 REUTERS / Mayela Lopez

SAN JOSÉ, Oct 13 (Reuters) – Costa Rica will prohibit access to shops and entertainment venues to all people who do not have a complete vaccination against COVID-19, the president of the Central American country, Carlos Alvarado, announced on Wednesday.

Starting in December, the public must present a digital vaccination certificate in restaurants, bars, cinemas, places of worship, gyms, hotels and soccer stadiums, the authorities detailed.

The measure complements a declaration of mandatory vaccination for the 300,000 state workers as of October 15, in addition to the possibility that private companies require it from their staff.

“Each person who is not vaccinated puts others at risk. This measure will allow more openness and employment opportunities,” said Alvarado. He also announced the relaxation of some restriction measures in tourism, vehicle circulation and hours of public access establishments.

Two-thirds of the country’s total population of 5.1 million people have at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, and half have the full schedule.

Alvarado said that there is still a significant part of the population without a vaccine despite the provision of doses and campaigns deployed throughout the country, including migrants without regular status.

Hospital services remain saturated despite a slight reduction in the rate of COVID-19 infections in the last two weeks. The accumulated cases are 548,000 and 6,750 deaths.

(Report by Álvaro Murillo; Edited by Miguel Angel Gutiérrez)

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