While looking for tractors, he suddenly ended up in porn

MPs are out of office

Conservative Secretary of Defense Ben Wallace also speaks of a serious problem. “It’s long working days, long evenings at the counter, and that has often led to behavioral problems for decades.” The mixture of a lot of work, high pressure and alcohol is “toxic”. “My advice to all MEPs is: avoid the pubs. Finish the day’s work and go home.” But not only alcohol caused scandals this year, also other things.

Speaker of Parliament Lindsay Hoyle: He recently suggested radical reform.
Speaker of Parliament Lindsay Hoyle: He recently suggested radical reform. (Credit: UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor/Reuters images)

Conservative MP Neil Parish was watching porn on his cell phone in the boardroom until he was caught by a colleague. The farmer’s line of defense that he accidentally landed on the side while looking for tractors did not last long. Parish had to resign. The case sparked a sexism debate. The Sunday newspaper “Observer” wrote of a “poisonous cocktail” that shook Westminster.

Parish’s party colleague Imran Ahmad Khan was also forced to resign: a court found him guilty of sexually assaulting a 15-year-old boy a long time ago. Conservative MP David Warburton has been suspended from his parliamentary group after a photo appeared that appeared to show him with cocaine. There were also allegations by three women of sexual harassment. The Labor opposition is also affected. Your MP, Liam Byrne, has been suspended for two days for bullying staff.

“They think they are untouchable”

Cocaine appears to be as common in Parliament as alcohol. In early December 2021, the Sunday Times newspaper reported that traces of the drug had been found in almost all toilets. Members of parliament, employees and other employees sometimes coke openly. “There is a cocaine culture in Parliament,” the paper quoted a source as saying. “They think they are untouchable, protected by their friends in the parliamentary bubble.” The administration announced that it would examine the use of drug detection dogs.

So far, however, the scandals have not had any major consequences. Speaker Lindsay Hoyle wants to change that. In the “Observer” he suggested a radical reform: This should include that employees are no longer hired directly by members of parliament, but via an external agency. Then there should also be an independent complaints office. These would be the first steps on the long road to restoring reputation.

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